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Tarleton receives rural libraries program grant

TSU Newsroom
Tarleton State University’s Dick Smith Library has been selected as one of 200 libraries to participate in “Libraries Transforming Communities: Focus on Small and Rural Libraries.” More than 300 libraries applied for the grant.

STEPHENVILLE — Tarleton State University’s Dick Smith Library has been selected as one of 200 libraries to participate in “Libraries Transforming Communities: Focus on Small and Rural Libraries.”

More than 300 libraries applied for the grant.

“Our library is so grateful to have been chosen for this opportunity to help our community dealing with this pandemic,” said Interim Library Director Tracy Holtman. “We look forward to working with the Stephenville Public Library and Tarleton’s Career Services to help those looking for job resources.”

As part of the grant, selected Dick Smith Library staff will take an online course on leading conversations, a skill vital to library work today.

The competitive award comes with $3,000 to help the library host a hybrid in-person/online conversation with local residents about job hunting. In addition, grant funds will enable residents to speak with other job seekers, learn about employment resources, and increase the libraries’ collection of career-related items.

According to U.S. Census data, Erath County saw a marked increase in unemployment during the spread of COVID-19 last year.

For more information in the program, contact Undergraduate Engagement Librarian Yvonne Mulhern at (254) 968-9934.

“Libraries Transforming Communities: Focus on Small and Rural Libraries” is an initiative of the American Library Association (ALA) in collaboration with the Association for Rural and Small Libraries.

Since 2014, ALA’s Libraries Transforming Communities initiative has reimagined the role libraries play in supporting communities. Libraries of all types have utilized free dialogue and deliberation training and resources to lead community and campus forums; take part in anti-violence activities; provide a space for residents to come together and discuss challenging topics; and have productive conversations with civic leaders, library trustees and staff.