Two Tarleton State University College of Education student teachers—Callie Childers and Kylie Urbanczyk—received the Robert H. Elliott Memorial Award Thursday, Dec. 8, during the Department of Curriculum and Instruction’s annual Reflections Ceremony.

Named for Robert H. Elliott, who joined Tarleton in 1981 as a professor in the Department of Education and Psychology and supervised the student teacher program at the time of his death in 1990, the award recognizes students who exemplify outstanding classroom qualities.

Childers, from North Richland Hills, is an interdisciplinary studies major certifying in early childhood-sixth grade. She completed her clinical teaching at elementary and intermediate schools in Granbury under the field supervision of Barbara Ray.

Childers’s mentor teachers supported her nomination for the Elliott Award, applauding her ability to perform under pressure, problem-solving skills and effective communication with both students and parents.

One school administrator noted that her “knowledge of instruction and classroom management will make her a master teacher on any campus.” Another mentor teacher noted, “Ms. Childers was very quick to recognize that these young first-grade students must have an enthusiastic teacher for them to learn and apply concepts.”

Urbanczyk, from Munday, is a kinesiology major certifying in all-level physical education. She completed her clinical teaching in Stephenville at junior and high school levels under the field supervision of Dr. Laurie Hawke. Her mentor teachers and university supervisor supported Urbanczyk’s nomination for the award.

Urbanczyk’s selection was based on her energy level and enthusiasm for teaching, and a positive attitude that led to students’ encouragement on a daily basis and a great rapport with pupils.

“Kylie brings all of the lessons to life, which motivates students to want to participate. She is knowledgeable about the topics, going into specific details with the students on what they need to accomplish,” noted her mentor teacher. Another supervisor said, “Kylie is an expert teacher— one of the best I’ve had the pleasure of supervising over many years. She is great at pouring on the praise in classes, especially with difficult students. It paid off. The students are more than willing to participate to the fullest extent when she is teaching.”

Friends and colleagues of Dr. Elliott developed the award that bears his name to honor his enthusiasm for education and devotion to students. The veteran educator and administrator served public schools in Colorado for many years before joining the faculty at Tarleton.