If there’s one thing we all pretty much expect to experience on Thanksgiving other than NFL Football on TV, it’s turkey. Here are some interesting facts you may not know about Thanksgiving’s most popular bird:

• Approximately 46 million turkeys are eaten each Thanksgiving.

• Male turkeys gobble. Hens don’t; they make a clicking noise.

• In a letter to his daughter, Ben Franklin proposed the turkey as the official United States bird.

• 88% of Americans surveyed by the National Turkey Federation eat turkey on Thanksgiving.

• Turkey hens are usually sold as whole birds. Toms are processed into turkey sausage, turkey franks, tenderloins, cutlets and deli meats.

• The average weight of a turkey purchased at Thanksgiving is 15 pounds and usually has about 70 percent white meat and 30 percent dark meat.

• The wild turkey is native to northern Mexico and the eastern United States.

• The male turkey is called a tom and the female turkey is called a hen.

• Turkeys have been around for at least ten million years.

• Baby turkeys are called poults and are tan and brown.

• Turkey eggs are tan with brown specks, hatch in 28 days and are larger than chicken eggs.

• It takes 75-80 pounds of feed to raise a 30 pound tom turkey.

• U.S. turkey growers produce nearly one turkey for every person in the country.

• Turkeys can see in color.

• Turkeys are related to pheasants.

• Commercially-raised turkeys cannot fly.

• Wild turkeys were almost wiped out in the early 1900s. Today there are wild turkeys in every state except Alaska.

• Turkey skins can be tanned and used to make cowboy boots and belts.

• Turkeys have a long, red, fleshy growth called the snood from the base of the beak that hangs down over the beak.

• The bright red fleshy growth under a turkey’s throat is called a wattle.

• Native Americans hunted wild turkey for its sweet, juicy meat as early as 1000 A.D.

• There are a number of towns in the United States named after the holiday’s traditional main course and we have one of them in our state: Turkey Texas.

Sources: National Turkey Federation, U.S.D.A., United States Census Bureau, Minnesota Turkey Growers Association, British Turkey Information Service,Canadian Turkey Marketing Association.